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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
through 4 teacher, and at her school they have protocols as well in san francisco, california. you had that list earlier of how many shootings at schools that happened in the past. i have it here as well, highlighted. unfortunately, there are so many in recent years. if you just take out the elementary schools specifically and you look back in history, it's not too long ago, i'll take you to tacoma, washington, first, february 26, 2010, there at tacoma elementary school a teacher there was shot and killed on school grounds. no children were present at the school when that shooting took place. i'll take you back to a report february 29, 2000, in flint, michigan. there a 6-year-old boy brought a gun to buelle elementary school in mount morris township. he killed his first grade classmate kayla roland. that's in flint, michigan. i'll take you back to 1979. san diego, california. fortunately, there, alex, brenda spentser, at the time, 16, pulled out a .22 caliber rifle from her family's house across the vietnam and said after she had shot some students, i just don't like mondays. this is r
the company that manufactured the gun alleged used in the shooting by adam lanza. in california, lawmakers introduced legislation to require background checks on anyone who purchases ammunition, and rick snyder vetoed legislation that would have permitted concealed weapons in schools. the president is coming now. let's take a listen and hear what he has to say. >> good morning, everybody. it's now been five days since the heartbreaking tragedy in newtown, connecticut. three days since we gathered as a nation to pray for the victims, and today a few more of the 20 small children and six educators who were taken from us will be laid to rest. we may never know all the reasons why this tragedy happened. we do know that every day ameri violence. we know such violence has terrible consequences for our society. and if there's even one thing that we can do to prevent any of these events, we have a deep obligation, all of us, to try. over these past five days, the discussion has reemerged as to what we might do, not only to deter mass shootings in the future, but to reduce the epidemic of gun viole
with illegal guns. >> a bill is already in the works in the senate. california senator dianne feinstein says on day one she will move to renew the assault weapons ban that ended eight years ago. >> it will ban the sale, the transfer, the importation, and the possession. not retroactively, but perspectively, and it will ban the same for big clips, drums, or strips of more than ten bullets, so there will be a bill. >> marking a major shift certain gun rights advocates have agreed that the nation's gun laws must be reformed. on "morning joe today" west virginia senator joe mansion, a democrat with an a-rating from the nra weighed in. >> never before have we seen our babies slaughtered. it's never happened in america that i can recall ever seeing this type of carnage. anybody, anybody that lives in america, anybody that's a proud gun owner, anyone that's a proud member of the nra, they're also proud parents and proud grandparents. they understand this has changed where we go from here. >> as yet the powerful gun lobby has been largely silent. on friday the nra said it wouldn't comment until all
of the union. meanwhile, california senator dianne feinstein's planning to introduce a bill had a would ban assault weapons as expected. conservative groups are already taking aim at it. on the drudge report, for example, one headline reads civil war senate to go for handguns. now, we were just talking about conservative rhetoric on a different civil war earlier. let's put war aside. let's put the militant language aside and let's talk about what is happening here, maggie. as you know, people follow this debate remember the original assault weapons ban which was itself considered very cosmetic. it was essentially at bottom a ten-year hiatus. it didn't take guns out of circulation. interest didn't deal with the gun show loopholes, background checks, lot of the issues that have come up after this mass murder i mentioned. and even that passed by just two votes. what's different now? >> well, what's different now is we had a spate of these shootings. what's different now frank sly 20 dead children. it is unimaginable, unimaginable, i think, for anybody. what's also different is the nra which ha
? >> no, abobut i'm showing it sh the difference between an arizona and texas, or arizona and a california. that's where a lot of this fighting will play out. i think rightly so. we may disagree with the decision making of one particular governor, but over time to eric's broader point over time, it becomes a national consensus around these things and those states eventually fall in line as we -- >> your -- >> as we witnessed in my home state of maryland. in 1973 you had african-americans suing because they were not follow the mandates of the 1954 legislation on bussing and education. so there is a process here that unfolds itself in time in the states have a way of working it out. trust them. >> you're saying that because you don't want to have a conversation with jan brewer. >> we have two decades of -- >> politically you're right. we don't have two decades because five years from now, the political worl is completely different with 50,000 hispanics turning -- >> i was waiting for the stat. >> that is such -- >> we're going to talk about this and michael steele is going to mention -- >> 5
look at who donated to the president, university of california, microsoft, google, u.s. government and harvard university. if you talk about where ideas are coming from, and where sort of american innovation is headquartered, obama won it handily by 43% he won santa clara county where the high-tech companies are centered. >> sometimes stereotypes hold true, right? one of the things that's interesting in the context of the fiscal cliff also is where not only financial companies not just the takers, but where ceos around the country cast their lot. one of the things that's interesting as january 1st approaches is to see, you know, the hysteria on cnbc and how that's adjusted. >> we're not saying anything bad about cnbc but go ahead. >> but do ceos continue to push a kind of, you know, low taxes mantra, kind of traditional fiscal sort of republican mantra or do they really say, we need a deal here, we're really to give and push republicans in that direction. >> and it would seem like they are willing to come to the table and meet the white house -- i mean first of all they lost basica
involves a challenge to california's proposition 8, a voter-approved ballot initiative that outlawed same-sex marriage. a federal appeals court struck down the law earlier this year. the court's decision to weigh in on marriage equality came as same-sex couples began marrying in washington state yesterday. on election day voters there and in maryland and in maine made history when they became the first states to approve same-sex marriage at the ballot box. joining us now to discuss is steve, chair of the gay and lesbian victory fund. great to have you. >> nice to be here, alex. s. >> so a lot of tea leaf read and arm chair prognostication around this. i am by no means a supreme court expert, but when i saw that they were taking up both doma and prop 8, question as to whether they would take up inform i them at all, it seemed to me a signal that the court was ready to make a big decision, and i just cannot imagine, especially when you have conservatives like john roberts, who maybe sort of a fiscal conservative and vote in support of something like citizens united, but socially does not se
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)